PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

What Facebook and Twitter Mean for News

Perhaps no topic in technology attracted more attention in 2011 than the rise of social media and its potential impact on news. “If searching for news was the most important development of the last decade, sharing news may be among the most important of the next,” we wrote in a May 2011 report analyzing online news behavior called Navigating News Online.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Year in the News 2011

The faltering U.S. economy was the No. 1 story in the American news media in 2011, with coverage increasing substantially from a year earlier when economic unease helped alter the political landscape in the midterm elections, according to The Year in the News 2011, a new report conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism.

CommentariesMarch 19, 2012

Newspapers: Building Digital Revenues Proves Painfully Slow

The newspaper industry enters 2012 neither dying nor assured of a stable future. The industry has rallied around a story about itself – that year-by year it is developing new digital products and new revenue streams to transition from dependence on print advertising. In 2011, that traditional advertising pool declined for a sixth consecutive year. The website of the Gannett Company, emphasizing those digital initiatives, now intentionally has no mention of newspapers on its home page.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Digital: News Gains Audience but Loses Ground in Chase for Revenue

Two numbers symbolize the intensifying challenge and opportunity the digital world poses for the news industry: In 2011, social media giant Facebook grew to 133 million active users from 117 million in the U.S.1 And in the final months of the year, tablet ownership in the U.S. nearly doubled, to 18% of Americans.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Cable: CNN Ends Its Ratings Slide, Fox Falls Again

After a year of declining revenues in 2009, followed by a year of declining ratings in 2010, cable outlets found some relief in the extraordinary news year of 2011. It was a relief, however, that could not answer the looming long-range audience challenges.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Local TV: Audience Rise After Years of Decline

After years of losing audience and revenue, local television news appears to have settled into a kind of equilibrium. Stations made less income in 2011 than the year before, but the decline was about what might be expected in a non-election year. And the overall audience for local TV news grew as stations added newscasts at different times and on additional platforms, including their digital channels. Local stations also expanded their online, mobile and social media offerings, but most have not yet generated a substantial audience.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Magazines: Are Hopes for Tablets Overdone?

Consider it a sign of the times: when Time Inc., the country’s largest magazine publisher, went looking for a new chief executive officer last year, it turned to an expert in digital advertising. In December 2011, Time named Laura Lang, then head of digital ad firm Digitas, to run its magazine operation. Lang had no previous background in magazines.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Audio: How Far Will Digital Go?

Probably the biggest development in the audio landscape in 2011 came in the growth of people listening on digital mobile devices. And one of the prime arenas for device use was car listening, the long-established domain of AM/FM radio.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

Innovating News in Native Communities

The ethnic media play an important role by providing news in both foreign languages and in English about places and issues that are often absent from the mainstream media. To provide greater depth, we issue reports on different groups at different times. This report focuses on Native American media.

PublicationsMarch 18, 2012

Mobile Devices and News Consumption: Some Good Signs for Journalism

The migration of audiences toward digital news advanced to a new level in 2011 and early 2012, the era of mobile and multidigital devices. More than three-quarters of U.S. adults own laptop or desktop computers, a number that has been stable for some years.1 Now, in addition, 44% of adults own a smartphone, and the number of tablet owners grew by about 50% since the summer of 2011, to 18% of Americans over age 18.