PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

The State of the News Media 2012: An Annual Report on American Journalism

New research released in this report finds that mobile devices are adding to people’s news consumption, strengthening the lure of traditional news brands and providing a boost to long-form journalism. Eight in ten who get news on smartphones or tablets, for instance, get news on conventional computers as well. People are taking advantage, in other words, of having easier access to news throughout the day – in their pocket, on their desks and in their laps.

PublicationsMarch 19, 2012

What Facebook and Twitter Mean for News

Perhaps no topic in technology attracted more attention in 2011 than the rise of social media and its potential impact on news. “If searching for news was the most important development of the last decade, sharing news may be among the most important of the next,” we wrote in a May 2011 report analyzing online news behavior called Navigating News Online.

PublicationsDecember 14, 2011

Where People Get Information about Restaurants and Local Businesses

The internet is the source that people most rely on for material about the local business scene and search engines are particularly valued.

PublicationsSeptember 26, 2011

How People Learn About Their Local Community

How do people get news and information about the community where they live? Traditional research has suggested that Americans watch local TV news more than any other local information source. But a new report by the PEJ and the Pew Internet and American Life Project, in association with the Knight Foundation offers a deeper and more comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem of community information.

PublicationsNovember 28, 2007

Journalists in Iraq – A Survey of Reporters on the Front Lines

In a new PEJ survey, journalists reporting from Iraq say the conditions are the most dangerous they’ve ever encountered. Ninety percent say most of Baghdad remains too dangerous to visit. Nearly 60% of the news organizations have had at least one Iraqi staff member killed or kidnapped in the last year. The survey is of 111 journalists from 29 news organizations reporting from Iraq.

PublicationsDecember 18, 2006

The Snow Effect

What difference has Tony Snow made since becoming President George W. Bush’s press secretary? The President has been more accessible, for one thing. Tony Snow, it turns out, also talks more than his predecessor, Scott McClellan. A PEJ analysis suggests that in his regular give-and-take with the White House journalists, White House Q&A sessions are wordier and longer with the former TV and radio talk host at the helm.

PublicationsDecember 4, 2006

The Times Wins a Straw Poll

What are the best newspapers in America? The question used to be hotly debated. But when Poynter.org readers were asked to weigh in recently there was tepid response. Does that reflect a stagnating newspaper industry? We offer the results of that effort here. But maybe the more interesting, or at least refreshing question, is what are the best news web sites.

PublicationsOctober 20, 2006

Will Congress Take Sides on Net Neutrality?

It’s a complicated, technical issue, but one that could have a major impact on the flow of online information. While many internet service providers want content providers to foot more of the bill, supporters of net neutrality warn such a system could create an unfair internet hierarchy. It may be up to Washington to play referee.

PublicationsOctober 16, 2006

All the President’s Pressers

President Bush's second term has brought a big increase in the number of solo press conferences. Bush had only had 17 in his first term but looks like he's on the way to doubling that number in this four-year stint. The president still lags behind previous White House residents, but the change suggests a different approach to the press.

PublicationsOctober 12, 2006

Brave New World

A media conference featuring a futuristic video and a keynote address from a BBC official sketched out a scenario for news delivery that may be just around the corner. But will the proliferation of citizen journalists and wireless news platforms create its own set of financial and credibility problems for the journalism profession?