PublicationsSeptember 12, 2007

The Latest News Headlines—Your Vote Counts

What would a world in which citizens set the news agenda rather than editors look like? A new PEJ study comparing user-news sites, like Digg, Del.icio.us,and Reddit, with mainstream news outlets provides some initial answers. The snapshot suggests both a drastically different set of topics and information sources.

PublicationsAugust 20, 2007

Campaign for President Takes Center Stage in Coverage

In the second quarter of 2007, the presidential campaign supplanted the debate over Iraq as the No. 1 story in the media. Barack Obama overtook Hillary Clinton as the candidate getting the most attention. And Republicans began to catch up with Democrats in exposure. PEJ offers a 2nd quarter report on the media.

PublicationsJuly 18, 2007

Is The Fairness Doctrine Fair Game?

It’s been off the books since the FCC repealed it two decades ago. But an old rule regulating content on the airwaves has suddenly become a topic on Capitol Hill and on the talk radio circuit. Is the Fairness Doctrine really headed for a comeback?

PublicationsMay 25, 2007

Iraq Dominates PEJ’s First Quarterly NCI Report

The war in Iraq eclipsed all other news in the first three months of 2007. The 2008 presidential race was the next biggest story, and most of that was about Democrats. These are among the findings in PEJ’s first quarterly report of its News Coverage Index, which allows us to probe the data more deeply than we can on a weekly basis.

PublicationsNovember 15, 2006

Back to the Age of Local Publishers?

Suddenly, local ownership of newspapers is making something of a comeback. Since the breakup of Knight Ridder last year, and the threat of more cutbacks in newsrooms, private ownership groups and individuals have emerged in cities from Boston to Los Angeles wanting to buy the local paper. Who are they? A rundown.

PublicationsOctober 18, 2006

A Harvard Panel Tackles the News Blues

The media landscape has changed dramatically since Harvard’s Shorenstein Center was established 20 years ago. And when journalists and dignitaries assembled there on Oct. 13-14 to evaluate the current role of journalism in our democracy, there was good news and bad. The bad was that new technologies have created credibility concerns and economic problems for mainstream journalists. The good news may be the emergence of the citizen journalist.

PublicationsOctober 12, 2006

Brave New World

A media conference featuring a futuristic video and a keynote address from a BBC official sketched out a scenario for news delivery that may be just around the corner. But will the proliferation of citizen journalists and wireless news platforms create its own set of financial and credibility problems for the journalism profession?

PublicationsOctober 5, 2006

The American Newsroom

A newly released book based on four decades of surveys of US journalists finds a profession that is steadily growing grayer, but lagging behind when it comes to integrating women and minorities into the newsroom. This demographic stagnation may well be a reflection of a mainstream media beset by a series of economic woes.

PublicationsSeptember 14, 2006

Alt-Weekly Readers

America’s alternative weeklies may have once conjured up coverage of sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll. But as the papers themselves reach middle age, survey numbers show their readers have aged with them—getting married and having kids—which poses a serious challenge: younger upstart publications could steal their readers and advertisers.

PublicationsSeptember 11, 2006

How 9-11 Changed the Evening News

When the planes struck New York and Washington 5 years ago today, they altered the course of the news people get as well. According to new numbers from ADT Research, viewers of network evening newscasts have gotten a beefed up diet of war and terror since then while seeing big decreases in coverage of domestic issues, from crime to technology.