Mar. 19, 2013

The State of the News Media 2013: Annual Report on American Journalism

In 2012, a continued erosion of news reporting resources converged with growing opportunities for those in politics, government agencies, companies and others to take their messages directly to the public.

Mar. 19, 2012

The State of the News Media 2012: An Annual Report on American Journalism

New research released in this report finds that mobile devices are adding to people’s news consumption, strengthening the lure of traditional news brands and providing a boost to long-form journalism. Eight in ten who get news on smartphones or tablets, for instance, get news on conventional computers as well. People are taking advantage, in other words, of having easier access to news throughout the day – in their pocket, on their desks and in their laps.

Jul. 20, 2011

FNC trails far behind rivals in Murdoch coverage

The scandal rocking Rupert Murdoch’s media empire—as well as the highest circles of British politics and law enforcement—has been a major story in the U.S. news media for two weeks. But how has Murdoch’s cable news channel here covered the story? A PEJ examination has some answers.

Jul. 16, 2009

The New Washington Press Corps

In the past two decades, the makeup of the Washington D.C. press corps has been fundamentally transformed. While the old media have shrunk alarmingly, two new elements have risen up to virtually replace them in number. What are the implications for news consumers in the U.S. and abroad?

Nov. 28, 2007

Journalists in Iraq – A Survey of Reporters on the Front Lines

In a new PEJ survey, journalists reporting from Iraq say the conditions are the most dangerous they’ve ever encountered. Ninety percent say most of Baghdad remains too dangerous to visit. Nearly 60% of the news organizations have had at least one Iraqi staff member killed or kidnapped in the last year. The survey is of 111 journalists from 29 news organizations reporting from Iraq.

Jul. 18, 2007

Is The Fairness Doctrine Fair Game?

It’s been off the books since the FCC repealed it two decades ago. But an old rule regulating content on the airwaves has suddenly become a topic on Capitol Hill and on the talk radio circuit. Is the Fairness Doctrine really headed for a comeback?

Jan. 4, 2007

Will the Times Pull the Plug on its Ombudsman?

More than three years ago, in the wake of the Jayson Blair scandal, the New York Times announced it would hire its first-ever public editor or ombudsman to act as an independent monitor of the paper. Now a published report raises the issue of whether the Times is thinking about eliminating the position. Such a decision would likely reverberate throughout the newspaper industry. What are Times officials thinking?

Dec. 6, 2006

Do You Know What’s on Your TV News?

There’s a battle brewing over whether the government should regulate the use of video news releases—prepackaged segments often produced for commercial clients—that look like news reports and sometimes appear on local TV newscasts. This PEJ backgrounder examines the dispute between television industry representatives and their critics.

Nov. 22, 2006

Bad News from the College Campus

According to the Student Press Law Center, large numbers of college papers are being stolen from racks and newsstands at an alarming rate this semester. In most cases, the perpetrators seem intent in quashing stories about controversial or unpopular subjects. And one advocate for student journalists thinks it’s time for college administrators to crack down on the problem.

Oct. 26, 2006

The Vanishing Embedded Reporter in Iraq

After the media complained about lack of access to previous conflicts, hundreds of embedded journalists lived, traveled and reported right alongside US troops at the outset of the Iraq war. Now, three years later, there are barely two dozen embeds left.