AnalysisJune 3, 2013

Newsweek By the Numbers

After a few very difficult years, Newsweek magazine, which sold for $1 three years ago, may be up for sale again. A Pew Research Center analysis of news magazine economics in the past half dozen years finds that in a difficult period for newsweeklies in general, the turmoil and decline at Newsweek has been particularly noteworthy.

AnalysisApril 25, 2013

Gun Control and the Media

The Twitter debate about gun control has taken many twists and turns since the Newtown killings, according to a new Pew Research Report that looks at the mainstream coverage and social media conversation on that issue. Which terms did the media most often invoke when discussing gun control? And how big a factor was President Obama in driving the narrative about it?

AnalysisFebruary 1, 2013

Will Conservative Talkers Take On Immigration Reform?

Back in 2007, when President George W. Bush pushed for new immigration legislation, PEJ research showed the degree to which conservative talk hosts attacked the measure. And, they themselves took credit for helping to kill it. Will these hosts reprise their staunch opposition this time around? The early indications suggest that perhaps not.

AnalysisOctober 25, 2012

Internet Gains Most as Campaign News Source but Cable TV Still Leads

As the presidential election enters the last lap, where are people going to learn about the campaign and the candidates? A new PEJ survey finds an increasingly diverse ecosystem for political news.

AnalysisOctober 5, 2012

Social Media Debate Sentiment Less Critical of Obama than Polls and Press Are

The reaction to the first presidential debate was better for Barack Obama in social media than in the traditional press, where the consensus was that Mitt Romney had won handily. But the sentiment differed by social media platform and generally criticism was more plentiful than praise.

AnalysisSeptember 26, 2012

How People Get Local News and Information in Different Communities

Depending on the local news topic, urban residents are more likely to use mobile and online sources, while suburbanites are most heavily into social media and rural residents are more inclined to word of mouth sources. A joint PEJ-Pew Internet report offers more about how people get local news in specific communities.

AnalysisSeptember 26, 2012

How Social and Traditional Media Differ in Treatment of the Conventions and Beyond

During what may prove a key period in the race for president, the candidates received very different treatment on Twitter, Facebook and blogs than in the mainstream media, a new PEJ study finds. The candidates each enjoyed a bounce in mainstream media treatment during their conventions. By contrast, social media showed little change, and the discourse was highly negative.

AnalysisAugust 9, 2012

For Communication Grads, a Modest Job Recovery

What’s the job market like for 2011 mass communication and journalism graduates? According to a new survey from the University of Georgia, there was an uptick in the percentage of bachelor degree recipients who found jobs and, for the first time in years, a small increase in their salaries. But the overall picture is far from rosy.

AnalysisJuly 25, 2012

On Twitter, Verdict on Paterno Unchanged by Freeh Report, NCAA

The conversation on Twitter about the Penn State scandal has shifted focus over the last month from the man convicted of sexual abuse to the school and then to the NCAA. But one constant in the conversation has not budged—views of Joe Paterno.

AnalysisJune 29, 2012

Social Media Passionate and Divided over Court’s Health Care Ruling

Users of Twitter, Facebook and blogs weighed in heavily on the Supreme Court Health Care ruling last week. PEJ examines the sentiment on each of the three social media platforms, how that sentiment shifted in the days that followed the ruling and the degree to which users delved into implications for the presidential contenders.