Oct. 1, 2012

Future of Mobile News

The percent of Americans with mobile access to the internet has jumped dramatically in the last year—a trend that has major implications for the news industry. A new survey of news use on mobile devices by PEJ in collaboration with The Economist Group examines how tablets and smartphones have changed news consumption habits and what that might mean for the future of news.

Apr. 23, 2012

How the Media Covered the 2012 Primary Campaign

As the 2012 presidential race shifts from the GOP primary battle to the general election matchup between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama, a new PEJ study reveals what the public has been told about the two candidates by the media.  It also finds that Mitt Romney emerged as the winner of the media primary weeks before Rick Santorum dropped out.

Mar. 19, 2012

The State of the News Media 2012: An Annual Report on American Journalism

New research released in this report finds that mobile devices are adding to people’s news consumption, strengthening the lure of traditional news brands and providing a boost to long-form journalism. Eight in ten who get news on smartphones or tablets, for instance, get news on conventional computers as well. People are taking advantage, in other words, of having easier access to news throughout the day – in their pocket, on their desks and in their laps.

Mar. 19, 2012

Mobile Devices and News Consumption: Some Good Signs for Journalism

The migration of audiences toward digital news advanced to a new level in 2011 and early 2012, the era of mobile and multidigital devices. More than three-quarters of U.S. adults own laptop or desktop computers, a number that has been stable for some years.1 Now, in addition, 44% of adults own a smartphone, and the number of tablet owners grew by about 50% since the summer of 2011, to 18% of Americans over age 18.

Mar. 19, 2012

What Facebook and Twitter Mean for News

Perhaps no topic in technology attracted more attention in 2011 than the rise of social media and its potential impact on news. “If searching for news was the most important development of the last decade, sharing news may be among the most important of the next,” we wrote in a May 2011 report analyzing online news behavior called Navigating News Online.

Mar. 19, 2012

Year in the News 2011

The faltering U.S. economy was the No. 1 story in the American news media in 2011, with coverage increasing substantially from a year earlier when economic unease helped alter the political landscape in the midterm elections, according to The Year in the News 2011, a new report conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism.

Mar. 19, 2012

Newspapers: Building Digital Revenues Proves Painfully Slow

The newspaper industry enters 2012 neither dying nor assured of a stable future. The industry has rallied around a story about itself – that year-by year it is developing new digital products and new revenue streams to transition from dependence on print advertising. In 2011, that traditional advertising pool declined for a sixth consecutive year. The website of the Gannett Company, emphasizing those digital initiatives, now intentionally has no mention of newspapers on its home page.

Mar. 19, 2012

Digital: News Gains Audience but Loses Ground in Chase for Revenue

Two numbers symbolize the intensifying challenge and opportunity the digital world poses for the news industry: In 2011, social media giant Facebook grew to 133 million active users from 117 million in the U.S.1 And in the final months of the year, tablet ownership in the U.S. nearly doubled, to 18% of Americans.

Mar. 19, 2012

Network News: The Pace of Change Accelerates

The year 2011 was one of marked transition and even some positive numbers for network news.

Mar. 19, 2012

Cable: CNN Ends Its Ratings Slide, Fox Falls Again

After a year of declining revenues in 2009, followed by a year of declining ratings in 2010, cable outlets found some relief in the extraordinary news year of 2011. It was a relief, however, that could not answer the looming long-range audience challenges.