PublicationsJuly 26, 2010

The Reconstruction of a Media Mess

The Shirley Sherrod saga started with a video posted online and ended with a flurry of finger pointing.  In a special report, PEJ reconstructs a chronology of how the story reverberated around the media echo chamber before dramatically changing course. And this week’s News Coverage Index finds that the tale of the USDA employee prematurely forced out of her job was the No. 2 story in the news agenda.

PublicationsAugust 5, 2009

Grim Employment Picture for Communication Grads

The 2008 class of journalism and communications graduates is suffering the worst job prospects on record, according to a new report from the University of Georgia. And as those numbers seem to be reflected in growing pessimism about the news industry among degree recipients, it’s forcing many of them to be more flexible about career aspirations.

PublicationsAugust 7, 2008

Amid Layoffs and Cutbacks, Communication Grads Find Jobs

A new University of Georgia survey of recent degree recipients finds that despite the growing economic ills of the media industry, the job market for 2007 graduates was basically unchanged from a year earlier. And sometimes, the absence of bad news can be good news.

PublicationsApril 23, 2008

How Different Is Murdoch’s New Wall Street Journal?

Many people expected Rupert Murdoch to be an activist owner when he bought the Wall Street Journal last year. So what’s happened to the paper under his tenure? A PEJ study of Journal front pages finds that under the new regime, there’s a lot less business and a lot more Beltway.

PublicationsMarch 26, 2008

Why News of Iraq Dropped

The tactical success of the surge and the tactical failures of the new Democratic Congress are among the reasons why the five-year-old conflict seems to have disappeared from the headlines. And then there are the competing demands of covering the most intriguing presidential campaign in recent memory.

PublicationsJanuary 9, 2008

New Hampshire Teaches National News Media a Lesson

It wasn’t quite “Dewey Defeats Truman,” but after the Jan. 8 Granite State primary confounded many of the pollsters and pundits, one of the key story lines that emerged in coverage of the McCain and Clinton victories was the media’s proclivity to predict and pre-analyze the results.

PublicationsJanuary 4, 2008

The Media Verdict on the Iowa Caucuses is Loud and Clear

The media were busy anointing winners after the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses. And the theme of change and surprise also resonated throughout much of the commentary. But a PEJ look at the caucus post-mortems finds that perhaps the most distinct aspect of the coverage was the certainty that something major had occurred that night in Iowa.

PublicationsMarch 7, 2007

The Media’s Verdict on the Libby Trial

The jury has spoken in the perjury and obstruction trial of Scooter Libby that so intimately involved the journalism profession itself. We know the Vice President’s former top aide was found guilty. But who or what else did the media implicate in its post-verdict coverage?

PublicationsOctober 18, 2006

A Harvard Panel Tackles the News Blues

The media landscape has changed dramatically since Harvard’s Shorenstein Center was established 20 years ago. And when journalists and dignitaries assembled there on Oct. 13-14 to evaluate the current role of journalism in our democracy, there was good news and bad. The bad was that new technologies have created credibility concerns and economic problems for mainstream journalists. The good news may be the emergence of the citizen journalist.